Thursday, April 20, 2017

Alternative Theories

Fact 1: ShadowBrokers release was either "Old-Day" or "Patched"
Fact 2: Microsoft PR claims no individual or organization told them (found them all internally, eh?)

And of course, Fact 3: the US-CERT response to the ShadowBroker's earlier announcements.

So there are a lot of possibilities here that remain unexplored. I know the common thought (say, on is that the Vulnerability Equities Process jumped into action, and helped MS with these bugs and then the patches came out JUST IN TIME.

Question: Why would the US not publicize, as Susan Hennessey has suggested, this effort from the VEP?

Fact 4: The SB release was on Friday, three short days after MS Patch Tuesday.

One possibility is that the SB team tested all their bugs in a trivial way by running them against the patched targets, then released when nothing worked anymore. But no pro team works this way, because a lot of time "patches" break exploits by mistake, and with a minor change, you can re-enable your access.

Another possibility is that the ShadowBroker's team reverse engineered everything in the patch, realized their stolen bugs were really and truly fixed, and then released. That's some oddly fast RE work.

Maybe the SB has a source/access inside the USG team that makes up the VEP or is connected in some way (they had to get this information somehow!), and is able to say definitively these bugs were getting fixed conclusively, and doesn't have to do any reverse engineering.

If the SB is FSB, then it seems likely that they have a source inside Microsoft or access to the patch or security or QA team, and were able to get advanced notice of the patches. This presents some further dilemmas and "Strategy Opportunities". Or, as someone pointed out, they could have access to MAPP, assuming these bugs went through the MAPP process.

One thing I think missed in the discussion is that Microsoft's Security strategy is in many ways, subordinate to a PR strategy. This makes sense if you think of Microsoft a company out to make money. What if we take the Microsoft statement to Reuters at their word, and also note that Microsoft has the best and oldest non-State Intelligence service available in this space? In other words, maybe they did not get their vulnerability information from the VEP.

There are a ton of unanswered questions, and weird timings with this release, which I don't see explored, but maybe Grugq will do a more thorough piece. I wanted to explore this much to point out one quick thing: The USG can not trust the integrity of Microsoft's networks or decision makers when it comes to national security interests.

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